Legislation raises hopes for Alaskan cruises this summer

In this photo taken Wednesday, May 30, 2018, a sail boat maneuvers near a large cruise ship near Juneau, Alaska. Congress has voted to let large cruise ships sail directly from Washington state to Alaska without stopping in Canada, a step that could clear the way for cruises later this year. The legislation approved by the House on Thursday, May 20, 2021 goes to President Joe Biden, who is expected to sign it. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer, file)

Congress has voted to let large cruise ships sail directly from Washington state to Alaska without stopping in Canada, a step that could clear the way for cruises later this year.

The legislation approved by the House on Thursday goes to President Joe Biden, who is expected to sign it.

“This legislation is literally a lifeline for so many of Alaska’s small businesses that were struggling, and it means jobs for more Alaskans this summer," said Sarah Leonard, president of the Alaska Travel Industry Association.

A longstanding federal law requires large cruise ships bound for Alaska to stop in Canada or start their trips there. With Canada forbidding any cruise operations through next February, the law threatened to eliminate any chance that Alaskan voyages could resume this year.

The House on Thursday passed a measure that, in effect, waives that requirement until Canada lifts its ban on cruising. That will allow ships to sail directly from Washington state to Alaska without stopping at a Canadian port such as Victoria or Vancouver.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy said the change will stop “a $3 billion hit to Alaska’s economy.” He said the state's vaccination efforts will make tourism safe for tourists and Alaskans.

The measure was proposed by Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan and Rep. Don Young, all Alaska Republicans, and previously passed by the Senate.

The cruise lines still need to meet guidelines set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent spread of COVID-19. The cruise industry has been unhappy with the extent and the time it has taken the health agency to draft those guidelines.

“While there is still work to be done, the cruise industry is one step closer to sailing in Alaska this year,” said Laziza Lambert, a spokeswoman for an industry group, the Cruise Lines International Association.

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(1) comment

The gardener

Our politicians are insane. Why is there a law that cruise lines have to stop in Canada in the first darn place?? That should be a decision driven by cruise line economics. The politicians keep getting in the way of business. What happened to common sense??

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